These days everybody’s driven, dear…

These days everybody’s driven, dear… very driven, very ambitious… Is that good or bad?I don’t know. I do know that there’s more to life than the pursuit of career, wealth, and all that stuff. Chasing your dream, you feel alive. But like, somet…

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These days everybody's driven, dear… very driven, very ambitious… Is that good or bad?

I don't know. I do know that there's more to life than the pursuit of career, wealth, and all that stuff.

Chasing your dream, you feel alive. But like, sometimes the rat-race becomes inhumane, you know; when you rush yourself, pushing like a machine neverending. Trying to live up to some abstract scale or measure.

Let's be happy. Can we at least agree on that? Let's be happy.

Hello, My Name is Tara. And I’m a Twitter Addict. | ::HorsePigCow:: marketing uncommon

So…I have put some rules in place for myself now. I can’t open Tweetdeck. At all. This service is just too good at pushing me all the information I need to continue in the addiction flow that keeps me from being productive or having a real life. I…

So…I have put some rules in place for myself now. I can’t open Tweetdeck. At all. This service is just too good at pushing me all the information I need to continue in the addiction flow that keeps me from being productive or having a real life. If I’m around people, I don’t open Tweetie (on my iPhone) at all. I focus on who I’m with and if who I’m with checks their tweets, I mention it and I don’t use it as an excuse to check mine (the spiral of anti-social). I can check the web version of Twitter 2x per day…and the exception is if I post a question and need to have a bit of a conversation. When that conversation is over, I need to exit. I know I’ve been told to obsessively follow my @’s, my searches (Whuffie, wuffie, tara hunt, whuffaoke, etc.), but I don’t anymore. This may have me falling behind in places, but I lived for years before it existed and I still have Google Alerts.

Some nice strategies for pulling back from Twitter.. Can be applied to other social networking websites too.

The End of Objectivity (Version 0.91) — Dan Gillmor

I’d like to toss out objectivity as a goal, however, and replace it with four other notions that may add up to the same thing. They are pillars of good journalism: thoroughness, accuracy, fairness and transparency. via dangillmor.typepad.com And a…

I’d like to toss out objectivity as a goal, however, and replace it with four other notions that may add up to the same thing. They are pillars of good journalism: thoroughness, accuracy, fairness and transparency.

And as for why Dan Gillmor wanted to “toss out objectivity as a goal”:

“Maybe it’s time to say a fond farewell to an old canon of journalism: objectivity. But it will never be time to kiss off the values and principles that undergird the idea. […] The idea of objectivity is a worthy one. But we are human. We have biases and backgrounds and a variety of conflicts that we bring to our jobs every day.”

This is an old post by him, by the way, from 2005. I noticed it again when I went back to my old Blogdrive site and read its bottom footer. I first noticed Dan Gillmor around 2004-ish (heheh) when Lawrence Lessig pointed out Mr. Gillmor’s book, “We the Media”.

It didn’t quite catch traction as a manifesto, unlike cluetrain. But even Cluetrain is not much heard of again nowadays, seems people have moved on. But Cluetrain’s 99 theses is still very relevant.

As is thoroughness, accuracy, fairness and transparency.

Plea from an Ignorant Bule – spruiked

I love Indonesia. It’s a fantastic country and I am so lucky to live here. But there are things that are beginning to really worry me, events that jeopardize the very things that I love:Pluralism — Somewhere along the way a lot of people forgot …

I love Indonesia. It’s a fantastic country and I am so lucky to live here. But there are things that are beginning to really worry me, events that jeopardize the very things that I love:

Pluralism — Somewhere along the way a lot of people forgot that Indonesia is not a Muslim nation. It’s not surprising, when the Religious Minister is crushing religious “sects” on the grounds of blasphemy and warning non-believers (Muslims) to “respect Ramadan”, by burning down brothels and rounding up beggars. Isn’t it obvious that sharia law has no place in a pluralist society? You can’t have it both ways, either your pluralist or your not.

Freedom of expression — Say what you like as long as you don’t piss anyone off. That’s how it works, from Prita and Omni’s crappy service (sue me!), to the government’s threat to ban a movie they haven’t even seen. When did it become okay to throw mothers in jail?

Democracy
— Elections does not a democracy make. The DPR has forgotten that its job is to represent Indonesians, not their own interests. The rampant corruption exposed by the KPK to the absence of public consultation on important issues like the Film Law saddens me. This isn’t government. Certainly not one worth voting for.

Compassion — Compassion is the key-stone, the glue that holds it all together. Flashing headlights, pushing in lines, ignoring door-staff, waving-on beggers, torching brothers, hunting down Malaysians and letting Papuans starve to death… where does it end?

Before you abuse me for being narrow-minded or judgmental, please remember what I said at the beginning of this post. I love Indonesia, but I’m worried. I care.

Must have missed this one on my twitter timeline… caught it on my email though :D

Anyways, yeah I totally agree that Indonesia is changing, and in a lot of ways changing for the worse (though some changes are for the better but that’s a different discussion thread).

I definitely don’t have an answer why (though I’ve read a few articles theorizing increased sectarian mentality, media over-exposure etc., but nothing conclusive) nor an answer how (to overcome, etc.), but I personally believe I should live with an open mind and with my open values, no matter what agendas other try to shove down my throat, no matter how often I am informed that I am a stupid idiot, that I think too much about abstract matters, that I don’t compete hard enough etc.

I live true to myself. I see other Indonesians who live so as well. I believe in hope for I see it before my eyes. I make no claim that I am an angel, but I do not push my agendas onto others. Living by example seems futile to many. I choose to try living by example anyway.

I second the corniness :D

Is Hobbes the inevitable outcome of the Internet? (from David Weinberger)

I heard a speaker recently (he wants to remain anonymous) argue that because the Internet makes public our every regrettable photo and expression, we will see each other at our worst, and thus the Internet — and then the real-world social world — …

I heard a speaker recently (he wants to remain anonymous) argue that because the Internet makes public our every regrettable photo and expression, we will see each other at our worst, and thus the Internet — and then the real-world social world — will become a  Hobbesian struggle of self-centered individuals in a war of all against all. Nasty, brutish, short, and did I mention nasty?

via hyperorg.com (JOHO the Blog)

Clue: the answer is “not necessarily”. Read the link for more.

Chandra Marsono: Malaysian Government’s Culture Confusion

This is a topic I’ve long avoided, but it just keeps coming up.To my friends in Malaysia, please do understand that this is not me being angry at you, not me insulting or giving negative sentiments about you or other Malaysians.This is directed to…

This is a topic I’ve long avoided, but it just keeps coming up.
To my friends in Malaysia, please do understand that this is not me being angry at you, not me insulting or giving negative sentiments about you or other Malaysians.
This is directed to the stupid people in your government and tourism board.

Since 2004, before Malaysia launched “Malaysia, Truly Asia”, the country intended to boost its tourism revenue. It couldn’t compete with Singapore as a mega-polis, even with the world’s tallest building in their backyard, so they invested in their diversity, taking advantage of its commonwealth status. Displaying all traditions from around Asia in their country, the country went with the slogan “Malaysia, Truly Asia” that a certain advertising agency came up with.

[…] on a business trip back in 2004, I asked my taxi driver to take me to an authentic Malaysian restaurant, and he took me to this restaurant which main course and specialty was white Tom Yam. If you know me and my epicurious sense, you’d know that I would always ask the servant or anyone working at the restaurant about the food, and they said it was Malay Tom Yam. “Its different!” they said. But it was the same to me.

Malaysia’s culture? Believe me, they had plenty. But now most of it has gone. Only some survived, most came from Borneo which the colonials didn’t touch because of the dense jungles and the fierce warriors (BBC Education’s : Elizabeth’s Kingdom). Yes, this was startling revelation indeed. If the Malaysians continued their Truly Asia campaign without showing that their culture was a majority of the cultures present in their country, they are afraid that people will leave and think less.

What ever the outcome, over the years this has been a big cause of the degradation of Indonesia-Malaysia relations. Most people here have negative sentiments about Malaysia, and its growing. Malaysians living in Canada with their Anti-Indonesia websites are helping fuel the fire. I just hope the Malaysian people are aware of their governments actions and take a stand to stop it. I really hope the relations between our countries will get better soon.

via Bilingual Minds (Chandra Marsono)

I’d just like to add that one reason many cultures don’t propagate that well within our Indonesian borders are issues of intra-tribal (intra-provincial?) cultural “imperialism.”

As an example, many elementary schools in Ontario and Perth teach Gamelan to children; now try it at Medan, and watch the fireworks fly…

But of course if the local Medan elementary schools would teach the Mandailing flute in their curriculum… but then what about multi-generational Javanese immigrants living in Medan, brought over there during colonial times to work the Sawit Palm plantations?

Still lots of room for more intelligent thoughts in this discussion. And of course, room for more action.

Update:

I’d also like to add that I don’t have a negative opinion of Malaysians. I think they are a wonderful nation that have developed amazingly in the past two and three decades. I remember that Malaysian computer science students used to go to Bina Nusantara in Indonesia to study, and nowadays the situation is mostly reversed. Malaysia as a nation has progressed greatly despite their political turmoils.

And I do not think Malaysia’s economic progress beyond Indonesia are merely an after-effect of their being colonized by the British instead of the Dutch. I do believe Malaysians have, at the very least, tenacity and perseverance. No nation is perfect though, and as such we can be so much more if we all would work together.

Obama school speech: Have partisan politics poisoned anything presidential? – Salt Lake Tribune

It just shows that in the contemporary discourse the crazy theories seem to trump rationality or any real sense that the president can’t be kind to school kids by telling them to do well” without it being taken as a political ploy, Hanley says. “I…

It just shows that in the contemporary discourse the crazy theories seem to trump rationality or any real sense that the president can’t be kind to school kids by telling them to do well” without it being taken as a political ploy, Hanley says. “It’s the way America rolls in 2009, and it speaks volumes about where we are as a nation.

Personally I’m very interested in watching the speech on C-SPAN or the Whitehouse Youtube channel. Obama’s speeches tend to be inspiring, and I enjoy them as “brain food” entertainment. And I do agree that partisanship poisons good will; and fighting narrow-minded partisanship IIRC is one of the original themes of his presidential bid campaign.

This is the kind of stuffs I should be posting at my FriendFeed.

…I would go on to venture that if I start posting stuffs like this on FriendFeed, I have totally lost focus on my day job. Either that, or suddenly I have not much to do (gasp!)

Today in Pictures – Masked – TIME

Gregory Bull / AP Masked Mexican wrestler Blue Demon speaks on a phone as he arrives for Mexico’s President Felipe Calderon’s third annual state of the nation address in Mexico City.via time.com’s Today in Pictures He’s all business, y’all.

Mexican wrestler Blue Demon speaks on a phone as he arrives for Mexico's President Felipe Calderon's third annual state of the nation address in Mexico City

Gregory Bull / AP

Masked

Mexican wrestler Blue Demon speaks on a phone as he arrives for Mexico’s President Felipe Calderon’s third annual state of the nation address in Mexico City.

via time.com‘s Today in Pictures

He’s all business, y’all.

Laconica is now StatusNet « StatusNet – Open Source microblogging service

I’m happy to announce today that our main product, the Open Source microblogging server Laconica, has a new name. StatusNet is the new name that simply reflects what our software does: sends status updates into your social network. We think it’s c…

I’m happy to announce today that our main product, the Open Source microblogging server Laconica, has a new name.

StatusNet is the new name that simply reflects what our software does: sends status updates into your social network. We think it’s clear and simple, serious without being stuffy.

As part of this change, we’ve also made changes to the company itself. From here on, we’ll be known as StatusNet, Inc. showing the renewed concentration on our core product.

So like, is the software now known as StatusNet, or will it still be named Laconica?

I suppose every rebranding is risky, and some rebranding attempts are simply necessary and worth the risk… Besides, Laconica as a name is not widely known outside of the Open Source / Free Software circles…

So take note everyone, the Open Source Twitter-like server software is now known as StatusNet…

Open vs. Fauxpen | Linux Journal

In 2006-2007, we saw that happen with SecondLife, as many developers (myself included) built software code that could run within the SecondLife world but was ultimately stuck there because you could not run it outside that world and/or run SecondL…

In 2006-2007, we saw that happen with SecondLife, as many developers (myself included) built software code that could run within the SecondLife world but was ultimately stuck there because you could not run it outside that world and/or run SecondLife servers on your own machines.

in 2007-2008, we saw that happen with the F8 Facebook platform, which locks your applications inside of Facebook and, while many developers have pushed to force the company to open up, tends to stay there. In 2007-today, we’re seeing the same thing with Twitter, which allows you to build whatever you want on top of it but doesn’t decentralize their approach, leaving developers potential slaves to the whims of the company. The same is true of the iPhone, which provides unusual access to the phone operating system and allows to develop interesting software on top of it but still keep developers away from being able to access basic things like calendar information via an SDK.

The quote is from Tristan Louis, quoted by Doc Searls. Another term that Doc tends to use is “Walled Garden”.

Another example I would add of an extensive “Walled Garden” infrastructure is the RIM-BlackBerry ecosystem of software and hardware.

Arguably, “Walled Gardens” tend to be successful (arguable because of “survivor bias” eg. we hear about the survivors, but not the failures which number much more). But one thing is certain: flowers planted in the garden tend to stay there.

And yes, I too am having fun playing in my garden :)