Mastodon, pineapples, social media and other unanswered questions

Mastodon, pineapples, social media and other unanswered questions:

Johanna Drott, aka. Sargoth (at Mastodon.Social)


cross-posted from my Tumblr blog: ferdifz.tumblr.com via IFTTT.
Originally posted on May 09, 2017 at 08:00PM. [Tumblr direct link]

Mastodon, pineapples, social media and other unanswered questions

Mastodon, pineapples, social media and other unanswered questions:

Johanna Drott, aka. Sargoth (at Mastodon.Social)


cross-posted from my Tumblr blog: ferdifz.tumblr.com via IFTTT.
Originally posted on May 09, 2017 at 08:00PM. [Tumblr direct link]

[Link:] Meet Google’s Secret Weapon For Understanding Language: ‘Parsey McParseface’

PopSci:

Systems for understanding human language have advanced significantly in the last few years, as researchers have improved approaches to artificial intelligence like deep learning. These methods set algorithms crawling through immense troves of data to draw connections between words and phrases. This is called “parsing,” or identifying each word and it’s role in the sentence.

Today Google is publishing the code for its language system called SyntaxNet, as well as an already-trained program for English called Parsey McParseface. Google’s tests put Parsey McParseface’s accuracy for correctly understanding words at more than 94 percent—close to Google’s internal benchmarks of 96 percent for the humans they employ for the same task. With SyntaxNet, researchers outside of Google will be able to train and implement their own language understanding systems for other languages, or try to beat Google’s score.


from my Tumblr blog: ferdifz.tumblr.com [direct link]

Google as a Non-Evil Open Source Entity

Google as a Non-Evil Open Source Entity
Re-posted with some editing from my original post over at my Google+ profile, from back in September 2011.

A few hours ago I spotted the following somewhere on my stream: …every Google service (and i mean every) is replaceable with an alternative. Of course this is true. What Google does is bring it all under a single roof and make it all work together. Which is why it is so important for Google to not be evil.

By virtue of Google being mostly dependent on Open Source, once Google starts becoming evil anyone else (with the adequate economic & engineering resources of course) can just take code from Google and replicate all Google’s services. So Google must stay not evil, or die.
Continue reading “Google as a Non-Evil Open Source Entity”

Android OS, and revisiting Open Source vs. Free Software

With the popularity of Android OS, and before it iOS and OS-X, it is time we realize (and become more aware of) the differences between Open Source & Free Software..

With the popularity of Android OS, and before it iOS and OS-X, it is time we realize (and become more aware of) the differences between Open Source & Free Software..

(small note: iOS and OS-X, both based upon the Apple Inc. initiated Darwin-OS project, is based largely on FreeBSD in its core, and uses a modified Mach kernel. Apple also contributes significantly upstream)

In the ‘perfect world’, all software would be ‘Free Software’ and there would be no need for the ‘Open Source’ pragmatic compromise…

(notice all the ‘scare quotes’ in the previous sentence..)

All the more reason to keep an eye on Nokia’s Maemo project, I say.

(reposted from TwitterBuzz, and Ferdi on FLOSS)

Open vs. Fauxpen | Linux Journal

In 2006-2007, we saw that happen with SecondLife, as many developers (myself included) built software code that could run within the SecondLife world but was ultimately stuck there because you could not run it outside that world and/or run SecondL…

In 2006-2007, we saw that happen with SecondLife, as many developers (myself included) built software code that could run within the SecondLife world but was ultimately stuck there because you could not run it outside that world and/or run SecondLife servers on your own machines.

in 2007-2008, we saw that happen with the F8 Facebook platform, which locks your applications inside of Facebook and, while many developers have pushed to force the company to open up, tends to stay there. In 2007-today, we’re seeing the same thing with Twitter, which allows you to build whatever you want on top of it but doesn’t decentralize their approach, leaving developers potential slaves to the whims of the company. The same is true of the iPhone, which provides unusual access to the phone operating system and allows to develop interesting software on top of it but still keep developers away from being able to access basic things like calendar information via an SDK.

The quote is from Tristan Louis, quoted by Doc Searls. Another term that Doc tends to use is “Walled Garden”.

Another example I would add of an extensive “Walled Garden” infrastructure is the RIM-BlackBerry ecosystem of software and hardware.

Arguably, “Walled Gardens” tend to be successful (arguable because of “survivor bias” eg. we hear about the survivors, but not the failures which number much more). But one thing is certain: flowers planted in the garden tend to stay there.

And yes, I too am having fun playing in my garden :)